Nonlocality-induced surface localization in Bose-Einstein condensates of light

The ability to create and manipulate strongly correlated quantum many-body states is of central importance to the study of collective phenomena in several condensed-matter systems. In the last decades, a great amount of work has been focused on ultracold atoms in optical lattices, which provide a flexible platform to simulate peculiar phases of matter both for fermionic and bosonic particles. The recent experimental demonstration of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of light in dye-filled microcavities has opened the intriguing possibility to build photonic simulators of solid-state systems, with potential advantages over their atomic counterpart. A distinctive feature of photon BEC is the thermo-optical nature of the effective photon-photon interaction, which is intrinsically nonlocal and can thus induce interactions of arbitrary range. This offers the opportunity to systematically study the collective behavior of many-body systems with tunable interaction range. In this paper, we theoretically study the effect of nonlocal interactions in photon BEC. We first present numerical results of BEC in a double-well potential, and then extend our analysis to a short one-dimensional lattice with open boundaries. By resorting to a numerical procedure inspired by the Newton-Raphson method, we simulate the time-independent Gross-Pitaevskii equation and provide evidence of surface localization induced by nonlocality, where the condensate density is localized at the boundaries of the potential. Our work paves the way toward the realization of synthetic matter with photons, where the interplay between long-range interactions and low dimensionality can lead to the emergence of unexplored nontrivial collective phenomena.

https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevA.105.043318

The hyperspin machine: simulating QCD models and dimensional annealing

https://arxiv.org/abs/2203.16190

From condensed matter to quantum chromodynamics, multidimensional spins are a fundamental paradigm, with a pivotal role in combinatorial optimization and machine learning. Machines formed by coupled parametric oscillators can simulate spin models, but only for Ising or low-dimensional spins. Currently, machines implementing arbitrary dimensions remain a challenge. Here, we introduce and validate a hyperspin machine to simulate multidimensional continuous spin models. We realize high-dimensional spins by pumping groups of parametric oscillators, and study NP-hard graphs of hyperspins. The hyperspin machine can interpolate between different dimensions by tuning the coupling topology, a strategy that we call “dimensional annealing”. When interpolating between the XY and the Ising model, the dimensional annealing impressively increases the success probability compared to conventional Ising simulators. Hyperspin machines are a new computational model for combinatorial optimization. They can be realized by off-the-shelf hardware for ultrafast, large-scale applications in classical and quantum computing, condensed-matter physics, and fundamental studies.

Two-flux tunable Aharonov-Bohm caging in a photonic lattice

We study the Aharonov-Bohm caging effect in a one-dimensional lattice of theta-shaped units defining a chain of interconnected plaquettes, each one threaded by two synthetic flux lines. In the proposed system, light trapping results from the destructive interference of waves propagating along three arms, this implies that the caging effect is tunable and it can be controlled by changing the tunnel couplings J. These features reflect on the diffraction pattern allowing to establish a clear connection between the lattice topology and the resulting AB interference.

arXiv:2102.06682

Topological nanophotonics and artificial neural networks

We propose the use of artificial neural networks to design and characterize photonic topological insulators. As a hallmark, the band structures of these systems show the key feature of the emergence of edge states, with energies lying within the energy gap of the bulk materials and localized at the boundary between regions of distinct topological invariants. We consider different structures such as one-dimensional photonic crystals, PT-symmetric chains and cylindrical systems and show how, through a machine learning application, one can identify the parameters of a complex topological insulator to obtain protected edge states at target frequencies. We show how artificial neural networks can be used to solve the long standing quest of inverse-problems solution and apply it to the cutting edge topic of topological nanophotonics.

Pilozzi et al 2020 Nanotechnology https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6528/abd508