PELM Project Kick off, 10 october 2019

PELM PRIN 2017 PROJECT 20177PSCKT

The Kick off meeting of the PELM project will be held on October 10th and 11th starting from 11.00 a.m. in room Aula Garda, Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico, Fabio Ferrari (Povo 1) 

We are happy to announce the event that officially marks the start of the PELM project “Photonic Extreme Learning Machine: from neuromorphic computing to universal optical interpolant, strain gauge sensor and cancer morphodynamic monitor”, programmed on 10th and 11th of October, 2019. PELM aims at demonstrating machine learning photonic devices. Within a single neuromorphic computing architecture, different platforms are specialized to given tasks by their specific characteristics.

In the meeting, the involved team of the University of Trento, Sapienza University of Rome, Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa, Università Cattolica of Milan and CNR-INO of Neaples, will talk about the project, the objectives and the working methodology to achieve together the desired results. 

For more info please see the agenda 

Multipolar terahertz spectroscopy by graphene plasmons

Terahertz absorption spectroscopy plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems as a powerful tool to identify molecular species through their rotational spectrum fingerprint. Owing to the sub-nanometer scale of molecules, radiation-matter coupling is typically dominated by dipolar interaction. Here we show that multipolar rotational spectroscopy of molecules in proximity of localized graphene structures can be accessed through the extraordinary enhancement of their multipolar transitions provided by terahertz plasmons. In particular, specializing our calculations to homonuclear diatomic molecules, we demonstrate that a micron-sized graphene ring with a nano-hole at the core combines a strong near-field enhancement and an inherently pronounced field localization enabling the enhancement of the dipole-forbidden terahertz absorption cross-section of H+2H2+ by 8 orders of magnitude. Our results shed light on the strong potential offered by nano-structured graphene as a robust and electrically tunable platform for multipolar terahertz absorption spectroscopy at the nanoscale.

A. Ciattoni, C. Conti, and A. Marini in Communication Physics

Topological Control of Extreme Waves

From optics to hydrodynamics, shock and rogue waves are widespread. Although they appear as distinct phenomena, new theories state that transitions between extreme waves are allowed. However, these have never been experimentally observed because of the lack of control strategies. We introduce a new concept of nonlinear wave topological control, based on the one-to-one correspondence between the number of wave packet oscillating phases and the genus of toroidal surfaces associated with the nonlinear Schrödinger equation solutions by the Riemann theta function. We prove it experimentally by reporting the first observation of supervised transitions between extreme waves with different genera, like the continuous transition from dispersive shock to rogue waves. Specifically, we use a parametric time-dependent nonlinearity to shape the asymptotic wave genus. We consider the box problem in a focusing Kerr-like photorefractive medium and tailor time-dependent propagation coefficients, as nonlinearity and dispersion, to explore each region in the state-diagram and include all the dynamic phases in the nonlinear wave propagation. Our result is the first example of the topological control of integrable nonlinear waves. This new technique casts light on dispersive shock waves and rogue wave generation and can be extended to other nonlinear phenomena, from classical to quantum ones. The outcome is not only important for fundamental studies and control of extreme nonlinear waves, but can be also applied to spatial beam shaping for microscopy, medicine, and spectroscopy, and to the broadband coherent light generation.

Marcucci et al. in ArXiv:1908.05212

Super-Duper Ising Machine by a Single SLM

Quantum and classical physics can be used for mathematical computations that are hard to tackle by conventional electronics. Very recently, optical Ising machines have been demonstrated for computing the minima of spin Hamiltonians, paving the way to new ultra-fast hardware for machine learning. However, the proposed systems are either tricky to scale or involve a limited number of spins. We design and experimentally demonstrate a large-scale optical Ising machine based on a simple setup with a spatial light modulator. By encoding the spin variables in a binary phase modulation of the field, we show that light propagation can be tailored to minimize an Ising Hamiltonian with spin couplings set by input amplitude modulation and a feedback scheme. We realize configurations with thousands of spins that settle in the ground state in a low-temperature ferromagnetic-like phase with all-to-all and tunable pairwise interactions. Our results open the route to classical and quantum photonic Ising machines that exploit light spatial degrees of freedom for parallel processing of a vast number of spins with programmable couplings.

D. Pierangeli, G. Marcucci, C. Conti in ArXiv:1905.11548 and Phys. Rev. Lett. 122, 213902 (2019)

See also